Magnetic Healing – Does it Work?

Was a man like Socrates right in proclaiming that magnets are useful in healing headache? Was Cleopatra only beauty and no brains, when she wore a magnetic necklace to keep her youthful look intact? Is the age-old belief that magnets have some magical power to heal us of our ailments only a myth? These a few of queries often raised when one questions the validity of magnetic healing and the basis on which this belief is based.

But of late there has been more than encouraging evidence that has emerged giving proof to the notion that magnets indeed have healing powers. Researchers all around the world have been researching on this subject and the positive evidence they’ve found is only increasing with each day.

There is sufficient and credible proof today that magnets are extremely effective in healing ailments are varied as spinal injuries, arthritis, broken bones, depression,  cancer, migraine and the list is as exhaustive as any.

It is a well-known fact that since times as ancient as the Egyptian, Greek and Roman civilizations magnets have been widely used and known to heal various ailments of the human body. But lack of credible and clear proof to claims of therapeutic effectiveness of magnets has meant that this forms of healing being on the sidelines to the more conventional forms. Though, magnetic therapy enjoyed quite some popularity in ancient times, in the more modern times it has no doubt waned due to the lack of good scientific proof.

Of late though, the signs have been more than encouraging. As pointed above, a number of studies have been conducted and many underway, even as we speak, have been gathering evidence like never before. Corroborating facts and claims of the past and at the same time opening up avenues that magnetic therapy never knew.

Since the times of the Greeks to the Indian and Chinese civilizations, and now to our modern times, magnetic therapy has surely stood the test of time. It was no flash in the pan and thus, has withstood the centuries of counter-claims and allegations. Isn’t this proof enough, to merit a second thought.

Thus, it is not right to out rightly dismiss magnetic therapy and rubbish its claims. And yet no is being forced to embrace it without a reason. The facts are laid in front of us; it’s upon us in our rationality to make the choice. Whether or not magnetic therapy works is a different question. After all even our conventional medicines fail, so what’s the big deal?